Saturday, March 8, 2014

Amanuensis Monday: Ezekiel Sanford's Schedule of Real and Personal Property, 1820

Transcribed with capitalization and spelling kept as in the original:
Schedule of the property, both real and personal, of Ezekiel Sanford of the Town of Dryden in the County of Tompkins, necessary clothing and bedding Excepted. 
Made the 27th day of September 1820 (viz.)
Real Estate, Twenty-three acres and one half acre of Land about ten acres of which is tolerable good, the residue rough.  Stony, side Hill.  No Buildings Except poor old Logg ones below $150.
Personal Property Consists of the following articles: one Small cow, one calf, two piggs, and one old axe, one old hoe, one old cracked five pail Kettle, one small porridge Pot old, one old dish Kittle cracked, one pine Board chest, one common old Table, five old chairs, three Earthen plates, one old pewter plate, two old Iron spoons, four old case Knives [i.e., table knives] and five forks, one small Looking glass, six bricks , one old fire shovel 54 years old, and one old pair of Tongs of the same age, one pair of old fire loggs*, one small Tea Kittle, one Tea pot, three cups and saucers, one tin cup, two tin pans, two pails, two bowls, one barrel, two furkins [i.e., firkins, or casks], two bottles, one half acre of corn $350.
The said Sanford owes $28..00.
                                                                         his
Subscribed and sword to in open court        Ezekiel X Sanford
before me this 27th day of Sept.                          mark
1820.  Augustus Crary, one of the Judges of Tompkins Common Pleas
The court value[s] the above Real Estate at $150
and the personal Estate at                            25
                                                               $175
*"Because Colonial fireplaces were so large, some more than 10 feet deep, the fires were often hot enough to crack the bricks on the back wall. To prevent this, an implement called a firelog or fireback--made from green wood--was situated along the back wall. In later years the firelog was made of iron." (Read more: http://www.ehow.com/info_8440046_colonial-fireplace-tools.html#ixzz2vQUPtYsn)










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1 comment:

  1. I love reading documents such as this. You get such an intimate view of that person's household, everyday life.

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